Harvey Oakley

It is with sadness that we share news that long time Delta east beach resident, Harvey Oakley, passed away on Wednesday, age 74 years.

Viewing and slideshow will be held on Friday, April 30, 2021 at McKenzies Portage Funeral Chapel from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Harvey’s obituary can be read be clicking here

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Outlet Channels Project – March 2021 Newslette

Received this update from the Province today on the outlets.

Regards, Scott

Outlet Channels Project – March 2021 Newsletter.pdf

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DBA Executive Minutes : January and February Meetings

Hi everyone, as part of our efforts to share the news on everything happening with the DBA, we’re posting our DBA Executive minutes. We hope you’ll take a moment to grab a coffee(or other beverage) and have a read at what your DBA has been working on these past few months!

Please find below the minutes of our last two DBA Executive meetings!

Please feel free to reach out to your Beach rep if you have any questions:

  • Far West Beach – Eric Olson
  • West Beach – Doug Ross or Melanie Moran
  • East Beach – Scott Greenlay or Laird Cole
  • Ridge – Kelly Tomalin
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Reminder: Spring Road Restrictions on Highway 240 start March 1st

If you’ve got any heavy loads remember to get them done by The end of February, as Spring Road Restrictions are scheduled to start March 1st.

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Tree dump burn

The RM has advised us that the tree dump will be under a control burn over the next few days.

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Reminder: Open House on Lake access and Boat Launch/Marina Group is on Thursday, January 28th @ 7:30pm

Hi all,

Just a reminder that we have organized a “virtual” open house on Thursday, January 28th at 7:30pm.

The two topics of discussion are:

1)the need for safe access to the Lake for the RCMP rescue boat, as well as recreation; and

2) the Portage and District Boat Launch Group(PDBLG) plans for the boat launch and marina.

We are organizing the Open House and inviting political representatives from the Federal, Provincial, and Municipal government to attend so we can discuss the issue and see about a permanent resolution.

The Boat Launch Group will also be providing an update on their activities, plans, funding and timeline in regards to relocating the Boat Launch and the building of a small marina.

We welcome any interested DBA members to attend. The event will be COVID-19 friendly, and hosted on Zoom.  Please note we are restricted to 100 attendees so we are using Eventbrite to manage the “tickets”

If you are interested in attending, and are a member of the DBA, you can register by clicking on the link below:

Once you have registered, a link and password will be sent to you a day before the event begins to the email you provide in your Eventbrite registration. (Note: If you do not register, or do not provide an email, we will not be able to send you a logon to the zoom session).

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Waste and Recycling Committee

The DBA has established a Waste and Recycling Committee the Terms of Reference are attached.


The committee members are Eric Olson Chair, Kelly Tomalin and Scott Greenlay.


The Committee is currently searching for a new location for our Waste and Recycling transit site.


We are working cooperatively with the RM of Portage to find a new location.

The criteria the committee has used to evaluate the new location is as follows:
• The location that does not affect any DBA members enjoyment of their properties.
• Development cost of the new site.
• Ongoing maintenance of new location.
• Year round access to the site.
Using this criteria we have evaluated several sites with the RM and will have a final decision before spring.

Eric Olson, Chair, Waste and Recycling Committee

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Membership Update: Lake access, the Boat Launch Group joins the DBA, and an Open House

Hi all,

Hard to believe in a few months the ice will be melting and our thoughts will be turning to summer.

As you may recall from our 2020 AGM, two major topics of discussion were: 1)the need for safe access to the Lake for the RCMP rescue boat, as well as recreation; and 2) the Portage and District Boat Launch Group(PDBLG) plans for the boat launch and marina.

I am writing to you to provide an update and to invite members to attend a meeting on January 28th @ 7:30pm

First, to the issue of safety and maintaining access for water rescue. We are organizing the Open House and inviting political representatives from the Federal, Provincial, and Municipal government to attend so we can discuss the issue and see about a permanent resolution.

Second, at that meeting, the Boat Launch Group will also be providing an update on their activities, plans, funding and timeline in regards to relocating the Boat Launch and the building of a small marina.

You may be wondering why we are discussing both at one meeting. The two are related. There is no point relocating the Boat Launch if the issue of access to the Lake isn’t addressed. We are also worried about a loss of life happening if the issue of boat access isn’t addressed.

Third, I am very happy to advise that the PDBLG has become part of the DBA. As you can appreciate it’s much more efficient for all of us if we have the DBA and PDBLG approaching development at Delta in a coordinated manner.  As part of the DBA’s ongoing efforts to have good governance and transparency, we developed a set of terms of reference for the committee, and are included as a PDF below. We are hopeful that with the PDBLG joining the DBA as a committee, it will also help with communication and coordination with all of us who live and play at Delta.

Lastly, in terms of the Open House, in addition to the politicians and members of the Boat Launch group, we would also welcome any interested DBA members to attend. The event will be COVID-19 friendly, and hosted on Zoom.  Please note we are restricted to 100 attendees so we are using Eventbrite to manage the “tickets”

If you are interested in attending, and are a member of the DBA, you can register by clicking on the link below:

Once you have registered, a link and password will be sent to you a day before the event begins to the email you provide in your Eventbrite registration. (Note: If you do not register, or do not provide an email, we will not be able to send you a logon to the zoom session).

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Wishing you the best for 2021

From all of us with the DBA, wishing you and yours the very best for a safe and healthy 2021.

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Delta Nature News December 2020

WHY REINDEER?

By Doug Ross

“On Dasher, on Dancer, on Prancer and Vixen.  On Comet, on Cupid, on Donner and Blitzen!”

This the cry that is said to echo through the frosty clear air each Christmas Eve as Santa guides his team of reindeer to each and every rooftop throughout the world.

Did you ever stop to ask, “Why Reindeer? Why not horses, or oxen, or yaks, or sled dogs?”  You might say its because these reindeer can fly.  That’s true, but probably Santa decided to have reindeer pull his sleigh first, and then gave them the magic power of flight to help speed up the long Christmas Eve journey.  Why then did Santa choose reindeer?  I have thought carefully about this question, have done some research on reindeer, and here are my findings…

Santa Clause lives at the North Pole, a very cold and inhospitable place. In fact, much of the far north is cold and a very difficult place to live. Horses and oxen could not find enough food to live there, and they would probably freeze during the cold winter days or nights. Reindeer, though, have always lived in the frigid north, and because of that they are well adapted to the snow and cold. And that is exactly the kind of sleigh puller that Santa required.

Reindeer have short compact bodies covered with long thick hair. The hair is hollow giving the animals extra insulation and warmth. Their compact bodies help to hold in the heat as there is less surface area exposed to the cold.

The reindeer’s ears are short, broad and well furred.  This keeps them closer to the body with less surface area exposed to the cold air.  Imagine how cold a donkey’s long, short haired ears would get if donkeys were to live in the arctic.  The reindeer also has a short furry tail.  Generally, long thin tails with short hair are found in warmer climates.  For winter warmth, most often short and furry is best.  The nose or muzzle of the reindeer is blunt and is also well furred so they don’t freeze.

During the winter the reindeer must constantly walk on the snow.  In order to keep their feet from freezing, they grow extra long hooves, their foot pads shrink, and tufts of hair grow thickly to protect those foot pads.  Not only is the cold a challenge, but the animals might sink into the snow while walking.  To aid them in walking on the snow, the reindeer’s elongated hooves act like snowshoes.

The barren north lands do not have a lot of vegetation, so what do reindeer eat? The answer is mainly lichen…a low greyish green type of vegetation that is combination of an algae and fungi.  Often called “reindeer moss”, not many other animals other than reindeer can survive on it.  Reindeer are also able to find nourishment in willow and birch twigs, or dried grasses.

As you can see the reindeer is perfectly suited to Santa’s northern home.  Santa has a very strong “sled puller” that can get enough food from the land, and is able to stay warm even in the coldest arctic weather.

 Are there reindeer in Canada other than Santa’s herd? Reindeer are from northern Europe and Asia.  They have been domesticated in places such as Finland where they are used for food, clothing, and for travel.  In northern Canada ((even in northern Manitoba), we have a very close “cousin” called the caribou.  Although caribou have never been domesticated, they are basically the same animal as a reindeer, and they too have provided food and clothing for many of Canada’s northern people for generations.

 So now when you hear the tap of the reindeer’s hooves on your roof top, you will know why they are perfectly suited as Santa’s Christmas helpers.

Caribou, like this one from Churchill, Manitoba have the same scientific name (Rangifer tarandus) as Reindeer. This one was eating (called browsing) on willow twigs. Yummy

Some other “Nature Nuggets” about caribou and reindeer:

  • Both male and female grow antlers.  In most other deer species, only males have antlers.  These antlers fall off and regrow each year.  The male loose their antlers in November, while the females keep theirs until after their young are born in May.
  • Reindeer and caribou have very specialized hairy noses.  The nose warms the cold outside air before it reaches their lungs.
  • Caribou and reindeer have an excellent sense of smell helping them to find food under the snow, or to avoid enemies.
  • Caribou in Canada’s north have been known to travel in herds of thousands of animals as they move to find food.
  • A caribou head is the animal seen on a Canadian quarter for years.  It is a tribute to how important caribou are to the people of Canada’s North.
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